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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

4 edition of Testing for therapeutic medications, environmental and dietary substances in racing horses found in the catalog.

Testing for therapeutic medications, environmental and dietary substances in racing horses

Testing for therapeutic medications, environmental and dietary substances in racing horses

a workshop held at The Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, August 18-19, 1994

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Published by The Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center, dist. by Veterinary Practice Publ. Co.] in Lexington, Ky, [Santa Barbara, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Veterinary drugs -- Testing -- Congresses,
  • Doping in horse racing -- Congresses,
  • Horses -- Effect of drugs on -- Congresses

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementeditors, Thomas Tobin ... [et al.].
    GenreCongresses.
    ContributionsTobin, Thomas, 1941-, Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxx, 218 p. :
    Number of Pages218
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17037667M
    ISBN 100964621304
    OCLC/WorldCa34688222

    For medication control, the main task of EHLSC in the risk management procedure is the establishment of harmonised screening limits (HSL).The HSL is a confidential instruction to laboratories from racing authorities to screen in plasma or urine for the presence of drugs commonly used in equine medication.   In McKinsey’s report for the Jockey Club, presented at the annual Round Table in August, 38% of those surveyed said that they would bet more if they knew horses were not given drugs.

    Colonial Downs ends racing meet after just 6 days. 5d. Hall of Fame trainer Lukas recovers from virus. 7d. Stute, trainer of '86 Preakness winner, dies at 7d. Kentucky Derby scratches general.   By the Drug Testing Initiative was created to attain consistency among racing laboratories, with five of 18 labs receiving ISO accreditation. That year the .

    Regulated Therapeutic Substance – A drug or medication with a recognized therapeutic use in treating horses that are engaged in racing-related activities and for which a Regulatory Threshold (q.v.) has been established by the relevant State Horse Racing Authority. Regulatory Threshold – The Regulatory Threshold is the maximum.   A Solution to Horse Racing’s Medication Problems. By providing horses with the necessary therapeutic medications to train and race. ins could include prerace testing for horses .


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Testing for therapeutic medications, environmental and dietary substances in racing horses Download PDF EPUB FB2

Veterinary drugs -- Congresses. Testing for therapeutic medications, environmental and dietary substances in racing horses: a workshop held at the Maxwell H.

Gluck Equine Research Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, August/ editors, Thomas Tobin. The book addresses specific regulatory procedures in place around the world to regulate the use of therapeutic medications and endogenous, dietary, and environmental substances in racing.

The book then addresses the specific regulatory procedures in place around the world to regulate the use of therapeutic medications, endogenous, dietary, and environmental substances in racing.

Equine drug testing is a form of drug testing applied to performance horses in regulated competition. Most common in racehorses, drug tests are also performed on horses in endurance riding and in international competition such as the Olympics and FEI-sanctioned horses in a competition Testing for therapeutic medications by various national organizations, such as the United States Equestrian.

WARNING: The information on the Controlled Therapeutic Substances List does not constitute and is not a guaranty, warranty or assurance that the use of any of the therapeutic medications at the dosage and withdrawal time listed will not result in a positive post-race test.

These guidelines are based upon the administration of a single medication. Drugs and the Performance Horse, by Thomas Tobin. Foreword by HRH, The Duke of Edinburgh. pp., Springfield, Illinois: Charles C.

Thomas, Proceedings of the Workshop on Testing for Therapeutic Medications, Environmental and Dietary Substances in Racing. Houghton E () The theobromine and hydrocortisone threshold values. In: Tobin T, Mundy GD, Stanley SD, Sams RA, Crone DL (eds) Testing for therapeutic medications, environment and dietary substances in racing horses.

The Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center, Lexington, Kentucky, USA, pp 69–73 Google Scholar. The racing industry is closer to uniformity in drug regulations and penalties than many admit, but agreement on race-day anti-bleeding drugs in a "toxic" environment will require some heavy.

1) Proceedings of the Workshop on Testing for Therapeutic Medications, Environmental and Dietary Substances in Racing Horse.

pages, 2) Furosemide in the Horse: its actions effects and regulatory control, A Testing Integrity Program Seminar held at The New Orleans Hilton Riverside, March 1. The development of Model Rules, standards, and best practices is an ongoing project of ARCI member agencies.

Relying upon the collective expertise of regulatory personnel in member jurisdictions in consultation with regulated entities, industry stakeholders, fans and individuals, ARCI committees consider ways to improve and enhance the regulation of racing.

Regulatory authorities have rightly recognized that many substances, or their metabolites, that produce a “positive” are present at trace levels and are likely derived from legitimate therapeutic medications or are of a dietary, environmental, or endogenous (from. Introduction. Scopolamine (l-hyoscine), a tropane or ‘belladonna alkaloid,’ has been sporadically identified in racing horses worldwide since the advent about 30 years ago of low ng/mL equine drug then, trace identifications of scopolamine and other environmental and dietary substances such as caffeine (Budhraja et al., ), benzoylecgonine (Camargo et al.

4/ Tobin T, Mundy GD, Stanley SD, Sams RA, Crone D (eds): Testing for Therapeutic Medications, Environmental and Dietary Substances in Racing Horses, Proceedings of Workshop, Lexington, KY, pages, [KY Ag Exp Sta #]. Drug Testing Introduction Truesdail Laboratories has tested in the area of racing chemistry for over 70 years, analyzing tens of thousands of biological specimens per year for the presence of performance altering and therapeutic drugs.

In addition to testing racing animals (equine and canine), we test for horse and livestock shows and exhibitions. Truesdail uses state-of-the-art. The USEF maintains a Prohibited Substance List; however, the USEF recognizes that horses under its jurisdictions.

might require legitimate, therapeutic treatment near the time of competition. The Equine Drugs and Medications Rules addresses these circumstances. An essential guide for racehorse owners, trainers, and veterinarians, this volume discusses 1.)zero tolerance for performance-altering substances in horses, 2.) thresholds or regulatory limits for therapeutic medications and endogenous or environmental substances, 3.) the need for scientifically established medication withdrawal-time guidelines, and 4.) national standards for Author: Thomas Tobin, Kimberly Brewer, Kent H.

Stirling. xiv. Prohibited Substance. A Drug or other substance that affects one or more systems of the horse that has not been classified as a: 1. Therapeutic Medication and, 2. Shall not be present at a concentration greater than the lower limit of detection in Samples collected from a.

International uniform medication rules and out-of-competition drug testing were discussed at the Asian Racing Conference, currently taking place in Hong Kong. Therapeutic use of substances. 1. Clenbuterol is a prohibited substance in quarter horses and other breeds racing with quarter horses.

There is no applicable withdrawal guideline for such horses. Any quarter horse reported positive for Clenbuterol by the Louisiana State University’s Equine Medication. This entry was posted in NL Article, Ray's Paddock and tagged Dr. Mary Scollay, benson, drug testing, drugs in racing, environmental contamination, kentucky horse racing commission.

The Racing Medication and Testing Consortium is not responsible for results differing in any way from the ones stated herein. Use of this database and its information does not lessen or relieve any trainer’s responsibility for affirming that, during a horse race, a horse is free of any therapeutic medication listed in his or her state’s.

No medication should be administered to a horse within 12 hours of a competition. Nontherapeutic or nonprescribed medications or substances should not be administered to performance horses by anyone. Maybe some competitors will always be ready to bend the rules (or ignore accepted ethics), even when doing so puts a horse's health at risk.

If horses are to receive proper veterinary care, suitable reformation on drug detection t~mes must be available to equine practitioners. Key Words: Drug testing, withdrawal times. CopynghtElsevier Science (USA). All nghts reserved.

T O PROTECT THE health and welfare of horses, veterinar- ians must legitimately use therapeutic medications.